Object-Oriented Meets Functional

Have the best of both worlds. Construct elegant class hierarchies for maximum code reuse and extensibility, implement their behavior using higher-order functions. Or anything in-between.

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Scala began life in 2003, created by Martin Odersky and his research group at EPFL, next to Lake Geneva and the Alps, in Lausanne, Switzerland. Scala has since grown into a mature open source programming language, used by hundreds of thousands of developers, and is developed and maintained by scores of people all over the world.
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Scala
2.11.6

Scala in a Nutshell

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Seamless Java Interop

Scala runs on the JVM, so Java and Scala stacks can be freely mixed for totally seamless integration.

Type Inference

So the type system doesn’t feel so static. Don’t work for the type system. Let the type system work for you!

Concurrency
& Distribution

Use data-parallel operations on collections, use actors for concurrency and distribution, or futures for asynchronous programming.

Traits

Combine the flexibility of Java-style interfaces with the power of classes. Think principled multiple-inheritance.

Pattern Matching

Think “switch” on steroids. Match against class hierarchies, sequences, and more.

Higher-Order Functions

Functions are first-class objects. Compose them with guaranteed type safety. Use them anywhere, pass them to anything.

Author.scala
class Author(val firstName: String,
    val lastName: String) extends Comparable[Author] {

  override def compareTo(that: Author) = {
    val lastNameComp = this.lastName compareTo that.lastName
    if (lastNameComp != 0) lastNameComp
    else this.firstName compareTo that.firstName
  }
}

object Author {
  def loadAuthorsFromFile(file: java.io.File): List[Author] = ???
}
App.java
import static scala.collection.JavaConversions.asJavaCollection;

public class App {
    public List<Author> loadAuthorsFromFile(File file) {
        return new ArrayList<Author>(asJavaCollection(
            Author.loadAuthorsFromFile(file)));
    }

    public void sortAuthors(List<Author> authors) {
        Collections.sort(authors);
    }

    public void displaySortedAuthors(File file) {
        List<Author> authors = loadAuthorsFromFile(file);
        sortAuthors(authors);
        for (Author author : authors) {
            System.out.println(
                author.lastName() + ", " + author.firstName());
        }
    }
}

Combine Scala and Java seamlessly

Scala classes are ultimately JVM classes. You can create Java objects, call their methods and inherit from Java classes transparently from Scala. Similarly, Java code can reference Scala classes and objects.

In this example, the Scala class Author implements the Java interface Comparable<T> and works with Java Files. The Java code uses a method from the companion object Author, and accesses fields of the Author class. It also uses JavaConversions to convert between Scala collections and Java collections.

Type inference
scala> class Person(val name: String, val age: Int) {
     |   override def toString = s"$name ($age)"
     | }
defined class Person

scala> def underagePeopleNames(persons: List[Person]) = {
     |   for (person <- persons; if person.age < 18)
     |     yield person.name
     | }
underagePeopleNames: (persons: List[Person])List[String]

scala> def createRandomPeople() = {
     |   val names = List("Alice", "Bob", "Carol",
     |       "Dave", "Eve", "Frank")
     |   for (name <- names) yield {
     |     val age = (Random.nextGaussian()*8 + 20).toInt
     |     new Person(name, age)
     |   }
     | }
createRandomPeople: ()List[Person]

scala> val people = createRandomPeople()
people: List[Person] = List(Alice (16), Bob (16), Carol (19), Dave (18), Eve (26), Frank (11))

scala> underagePeopleNames(people)
res1: List[String] = List(Alice, Bob, Frank)

Let the compiler figure out the types for you

The Scala compiler is smart about static types. Most of the time, you need not tell it the types of your variables. Instead, its powerful type inference will figure them out for you.

In this interactive REPL session (Read-Eval-Print-Loop), we define a class and two functions. You can observe that the compiler infers the result types of the functions automatically, as well as all the intermediate values.

Concurrent/Distributed
val x = future { someExpensiveComputation() }
val y = future { someOtherExpensiveComputation() }
val z = for (a <- x; b <- y) yield a*b
for (c <- z) println("Result: " + c)
println("Meanwhile, the main thread goes on!")

Go Concurrent or Distributed with Futures & Promises

In Scala, futures and promises can be used to process data asynchronously, making it easier to parallelize or even distribute your application.

In this example, the future{} construct evaluates its argument asynchronously, and returns a handle to the asynchronous result as a Future[Int]. For-comprehensions can be used to register new callbacks (to post new things to do) when the future is completed, i.e., when the computation is finished. And since all this is executed asynchronously, without blocking, the main program thread can continue doing other work in the meantime.

Traits
abstract class Spacecraft {
  def engage(): Unit
}
trait CommandoBridge extends Spacecraft {
  def engage(): Unit = {
    for (_ <- 1 to 3)
      speedUp()
  }
  def speedUp(): Unit
}
trait PulseEngine extends Spacecraft {
  val maxPulse: Int
  var currentPulse: Int = 0
  def speedUp(): Unit = {
    if (currentPulse < maxPulse)
      currentPulse += 1
  }
}
class StarCruiser extends Spacecraft
                     with CommandoBridge
                     with PulseEngine {
  val maxPulse = 200
}

Flexibly Combine Interface & Behavior

In Scala, multiple traits can be mixed into a class to combine their interface and their behavior.

Here, a StarCruiser is a Spacecraft with a CommandoBridge that knows how to engage the ship (provided a means to speed up) and a PulseEngine that specifies how to speed up.

Pattern matching
// Define a set of case classes for representing binary trees.
sealed abstract class Tree
case class Node(elem: Int, left: Tree, right: Tree) extends Tree
case object Leaf extends Tree

// Return the in-order traversal sequence of a given tree.
def inOrder(t: Tree): List[Int] = t match {
  case Node(e, l, r) => inOrder(l) ::: List(e) ::: inOrder(r)
  case Leaf          => List()
}

Switch on the structure of your data

In Scala, case classes are used to represent structural data types. They implicitly equip the class with meaningful toString, equals and hashCode methods, as well as the ability to be deconstructed with pattern matching.

In this example, we define a small set of case classes that represent binary trees of integers (the generic version is omitted for simplicity here). In inOrder, the match construct chooses the right branch, depending on the type of t, and at the same time deconstructs the arguments of a Node.

Go Functional with Higher-Order Functions

In Scala, functions are values, and can be defined as anonymous functions with a concise syntax.

Scala
val people: Array[Person]

// Partition `people` into two arrays `minors` and `adults`.
// Use the higher-order function `(_.age < 18)` as a predicate for partitioning.
val (minors, adults) = people partition (_.age < 18)
Java
List<Person> people;

List<Person> minors = new ArrayList<Person>(people.size());
List<Person> adults = new ArrayList<Person>(people.size());
for (Person person : people) {
    if (person.getAge() < 18)
        minors.add(person);
    else
        adults.add(person);
}

In the Scala example on the left, the partition method, available on all collection types (including Array), returns two new collections of the same type. Elements from the original collection are partitioned according to a predicate, which is given as a lambda, i.e., an anonymous function. The _ stands for the parameter to the lambda, i.e., the element that is being tested. This particular lambda can also be written as (x => x.age < 18).

The same program is implemented in Java on the right.

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What's New

announcement
date icon Thursday, March 05, 2015

We are very pleased to announce the availability of Scala 2.11.6!

Scala 2.11.6 is a bugfix release that is binary compatible with previous releases in the Scala 2.11 series. We would like to highlight the following changes:

  • We fixed a cross-site scripting vulnerability in Scaladoc’s JavaScript. Many thanks to @todesking for discovering this, suggesting a fix, and for delaying disclosure until this release! This bug could be used to access sensitive information on sites hosted on the same domain as Scaladoc-generated documentation. All previous versions of Scaladoc are affected (Scala 2.10.5 includes the fix as well). We do recommend, as a general precaution, to host Scaladoc documentation on its own domain.
  • SI-9089 repl is now much less crash-and-burny when calling a function (which turns out to be a common thing people do in a REPL). Also, apologies to the author of SI-9022, who reported this before the bug was discovered and you had to wait in line for like three hours on a Tuesday afternoon. Or, maybe, that honor should go to the enigmatic dk14.
  • SI-8759 no need to enter almost half the konami code to enter a right square bracket in the REPL (via jline 2.12.1). Thank you for implementing the jline fix, @michael72, and kudos to @jdillon and @trptcolin for cutting a new jline release just for us!

Compared to 2.11.5, this release resolves 38 issues. Out of 100, we merged 58 pull requests. Before upgrading, please also check the known issues for this release.

In 2015, 2.11 minor releases will be released quarterly, or sooner if prompted by a serious issue.

Scala IDE

The current release of Scala IDE includes Scala 2.11.6 is available on the download site (or as an update to version 4.0 of the plugin).

Available Libraries and Frameworks

A large number of Scala projects have been released against Scala 2.11. Please refer to the list of libraries and frameworks available for Scala 2.11.

Reminder: Do Not Use Scala 2.11.3

Due to a binary incompatibility in Scala 2.11.3, we recommend upgrading to Scala 2.11.6, which resolves the incompatibility, as well as another blocker issue that was discovered in the days after the 2.11.3 release.

We have analyzed the mistakes that lead to the breakage (human error), and are taking measures to prevent this from happening again. We apologize for the inconvenience, and thank everyone who was involved in reporting and diagnosing these critical issues.

Release Notes for the Scala 2.11 Series

The release notes for the Scala 2.11 series, which also apply to the current minor release, are available in the release notes for Scala 2.11.1. They contain important information such as:

  • The specification of binary compatibility between minor releases.
  • Details on new features, important changes and deprecations in Scala 2.11.

Contributors

A big thank you to everyone who’s helped improve Scala by reporting bugs, improving our documentation, spreading kindness in mailing lists and other public fora, and submitting and reviewing pull requests! You are all magnificent.

According to git shortlog -sn --no-merges v2.11.5..v2.11.6, 25 people contributed to this minor release: Jason Zaugg, Adriaan Moors, Lukas Rytz, A. P. Marki, Denton Cockburn, Rex Kerr, mpociecha, Aleksandar Prokopec, Jan Bessai, Eugene Burmako, JustinPihony, Kornel Kielczewski, Krzysztof Romanowski, Eric Peters, Lyle Kopnicky, Mark Zitnik, Michael Pigg, Miles Sabin, BartekJanota, Simon Ochsenreither, Sébastien Doeraene, Viktor Klang, dickwall, jhegedus42, and Ikumi Shimizu. Thank you!

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Today, we announced the release of Scala.js v0.6.0, the Scala to JavaScript compiler, and dropped the experimental flag associated to it. Yes, you read it...
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